Secondary Sources (Other Sources of Interest)

I explored the following sources thoroughly, and any of them would be very helpful in furthering one’s knowledge beyond what is explained in my blog.

Kingsbury, J. B. “The Last Witch of England.” Folklore 61.3 (1950): 134-45. JSTOR. Web. 9 Dec. 2012. <http://0-www.jstor.org.wncln.wncln.org/stable/pdfplus/1257743.pdf&gt;.

  • The author details the circumstances surrounding the execution of the last woman accused of being a witch in England.  He also explains how the Enlightenment caused witchcraft accusations to vanish in the 1700s.

Matossian, Mary K. “Bewitched or Intoxicated? The Etiology of Witch Persecution in Early Modern England.” Medizinhistorisches Journal (1983): 33-42. JSTOR. Web. 9 Dec. 2012. <http://0-www.jstor.org.wncln.wncln.org/stable/pdfplus/25803730.pdf&gt;.

  • The author describes the differences between English witch beliefs and those of other European countries.  She also explores the origins of witchcraft in England.

Paxson, James J. “Theorizing the Mysteries’ End in England, the Artificial Demonic, and the Sixteenth-Century Witch-Craze.” Criticism 39.4 (1997): 481-502. Print.

  • The author talks about the widespread obsession with witches in England in the sixteenth century.  He also explains some of the superstitions about demons that were present in England during that time as well.

Wilby, Emma. “The Witch’s Familiar and the Fairy in Early Modern England and Scotland.” Folklore 111.2 (2000): 283-305. Print.

  • The author explores the folklore of witches’ familiars, and of fairies, documenting superstitions concerning each.

“Witchcraft In Elizabethan England.” Witchcraft In Elizabethan England. Web. 9 Dec. 2012. <http://www.cyberwitchcraft.com/witchcraft-in-elizabethan-england.html&gt;.

  • This page describes many facets of witch lore from the English Renaissance, including superstitions, the origin of witchcraft, and the demise of witchcraft.
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