Bibliography

witchandfamiliars

Hoak, Dale. “The European Witchcraze Revisited: 2. WITCH-HUNTING.” History Today (1981): 22-26. Print.

Kingsbury, J. B. “The Last Witch of England.” Folklore 61.3 (1950): 134-45. JSTOR. Web. 9 Dec. 2012. <http://0-www.jstor.org.wncln.wncln.org/stable/pdfplus/1257743.pdf&gt;.

Matossian, Mary K. “Bewitched or Intoxicated? The Etiology of Witch Persecution in Early Modern England.” Medizinhistorisches Journal (1983): 33-42. JSTOR. Web. 9 Dec. 2012. <http://0-www.jstor.org.wncln.wncln.org/stable/pdfplus/25803730.pdf&gt;.

Murray, M. A. “A Male Witch and His Familiar.” Folklore 63.4 (1952): 227. JSTOR. Web. 9 Dec. 2012. <http://http://0-www.jstor.org.wncln.wncln.org/stable/pdfplus/1257110.pdf&gt;.

Paxson, James J. “Theorizing the Mysteries’ End in England, the Artificial Demonic, and the Sixteenth-Century Witch-Craze.” Criticism 39.4 (1997): 481-502. Print.

Sullivan, Margaret A. “The Witches of Durer and Hans Baldung Grien.” Renaissance Quarterly 53.2 (2000): 333-401. JSTOR. Web. 9 Dec. 2012. <http://http://0-www.jstor.org.wncln.wncln.org/stable/pdfplus/2901872.pdf&gt;.

Wilby, Emma. “The Witch’s Familiar and the Fairy in Early Modern England and Scotland.” Folklore 111.2 (2000): 283-305. Print.

“Witchcraft In Elizabethan England.” Witchcraft In Elizabethan England. Web. 9 Dec. 2012. <http://www.cyberwitchcraft.com/witchcraft-in-elizabethan-england.html&gt;.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s